GIANT ABILITY

Aiming to support children & families living with a disability, helping build participants confidence and self esteem.

GIANT Ability aims to support children and families living with a disability, through a monthly sporting day full of activities that develop the necessary life skills needed to be a valued community member. The program aims to support families that have a child with a disability by coming together for a monthly Family Recreation and Sporting Day that encourages community connection and build a robust support network.

The day provides and promotes opportunities, support, intervention, training and self-challenging pursuits for both the child and their families/carer. Character and leadership development exercises are integrated with engaging hands-on activities that build resourcefulness, confidence and leadership skills, equipping them with skills to be an active citizen in their community. Each session runs for 2 hours over the course of a year. The program will culminate with a Family day at a GIANTS home game. A video of a families journey will be played at the end of program celebration.

PROGRAM AIMS

  • Build participants’ Interpersonal knowledge and life skills, knowledge of sport and nutrition
  • Build participants leadership traits and create ways of implementing them within their community
  • Build participants confidence and self esteem
  • Connect cultures, locations and families
  • Empower, equip and professionally develop parents, carers, agency staff
  • Leverage the strengths of partner agencies to meet common community engagement objectives

PROJECT EVALUATION

  • 50 families participate in the monthly sessions
  • 12 sporting sessions, 1 per month
  • 3 guest GIANTS presenters involved
  • Students participating / demonstrating learning modified games
  • Family before and after survey – goals, values inventory, confidence, learning and engagement outcomes
  • Media and positive PR outcomes
  • Family and participant case studies of achievements and positive behaviour changes